General Mills reverses course on right to sue after backlash

Virtually every major company has legal terms or terms of service to which customers consent when they make a purchase or provide personal information. Some include an agreement that disputes and any damages be settled by an arbitrator, rather than a judge or jury. Consumer advocates say arbitration is generally business-friendly and eliminates customer protections like class-action lawsuits.

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2
How St Peter’s is given the Dutch touch with its Easter flowers - FT.com

On Easter Sunday, an altar will rise by electronic miracle from a platform before the main door of St Peter’s. On it, Pope Francis will celebrate the Eucharist before the crowds. As he blesses the wafer, he will be surrounded by floral decorations, including tulips, daffodils and even some out-of-season roses. The flowers are not arranged by his cardinals or grown in the Vatican gardens. They have come all the way from the Netherlands and are arranged by Dutch designers and a team of 30 Dutch helpers. When His Holiness re-emerges on the balcony to bless the world, the team of Dutch arrangers will be waiting, unseen, in the loggia behind him, ready for their annual audience of thanks.

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How to Rein in Medicare's Runaway Costs

This problem goes beyond a single drug. Of the $20 billion Medicare spent on drugs administered by doctors in 2010, 85 percent went to the 55 most expensive ones. In what seems unlikely to be a coincidence, 42 of those drugs also showed an increase in use from 2008 to 2010. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the agency that runs Medicare, says it’s required to pay for treatment that a doctor deems medically necessary, and it lacks the authority to direct treatment based on cost. All Medicare can do to control costs is tell doctors the price of what they’re prescribing as well as the alternatives. Which is to say, almost nothing.

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5 Reasons American Women Won’t Breastfeed - Five Things - WSJ

Originally, synthetic formula was meant as a more-nutritious alternative to animal milk for infants whose mothers had died in child birth or otherwise were not available to breastfeed. By the late early 1900s, commercial formula brands were marketing their powders in women’s magazines. “Mothers were told they needed formula to create more milk, or to rest or exercise — a lot of incorrect recommendations,” according to Marsha Walker, executive director of the National Alliance for Breastfeeding Advocacy.

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Russia’s friends in black

IF EUROPE’S far-right parties do as well as many expect in May’s European election, no world leader will be happier than Vladimir Putin. For a man who claims to be defending Russian-speakers in Ukraine against fascists and Nazis, the Russian president has some curious bedfellows on the fringes of European politics, ranging from the creepy uniformed followers of Jobbik in Hungary to the more scrubbed-up National Front in France.

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Attention Shoppers: Fruit and Vegetable Prices Are Rising - Real Time Economics - WSJ

And the price increases may already be happening. Grocery prices rose by 0.5% for the second-straight month in March, according to the Labor Department’s consumer-price index, released Tuesday. It was the largest two-month gain in the food-at-home category since 2011. Fruit and vegetable prices rose 0.9% last month, after a 1.1% gain in February. Meat and dairy prices are also increasing. Meanwhile, overall consumer prices rose just 0.2% last month, as broader inflation in the economy remains tepid.

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Wealthy investors flock to fine art funds

"You get the benefit of a beautiful work of art you can enjoy on your wall," said Diana Wierbicki, who specializes in art law at Withers. "It's also an asset that is appreciating in value, because it's a market that's so strong."

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Russia’s friends in black

IF EUROPE’S far-right parties do as well as many expect in May’s European election, no world leader will be happier than Vladimir Putin. For a man who claims to be defending Russian-speakers in Ukraine against fascists and Nazis, the Russian president has some curious bedfellows on the fringes of European politics, ranging from the creepy uniformed followers of Jobbik in Hungary to the more scrubbed-up National Front in France.

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Covestor

Keep me logged in

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The Richer You Are the Older You’ll Get - Real Time Economics - WSJ

Here’s the sort of detail this remarkable data set can show. You can look at a man born in 1940 and see that during the 1980s, the mid-point of his career, his income was in the top 10% for his age group. If that man lives to age 55 he can expect to live an additional 34.9 years, or to the age of 89.9. That’s six years longer than a man whose career followed the same arc, but who was born in 1920.

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The fuel of the future, unfortunately

WHAT more could one want? It is cheap and simple to extract, ship and burn. It is abundant: proven reserves amount to 109 years of current consumption, reckons BP, a British energy giant. They are mostly in politically stable places. There is a wide choice of dependable sellers, such as BHP Billiton (Anglo-Australian), Glencore (Anglo-Swiss), Peabody Energy and Arch Coal (both American).

13
Qatar Cuts Number of World Cup Soccer Stadiums as Costs Rise

“As is the case with any FIFA World Cup, once a country is chosen as host, a review of the bid plans is made with the organizers to propose the final host cities and stadia projects, which then need to be approved by the FIFA Executive Committee,” Qatar’s Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy said in an e-mailed statement today. “The requirement is a minimum of eight and a maximum of 12 stadia.”

14
Bacon sales sizzle to all-time high

Indeed, for food marketers and foodies alike, bacon is the gift that keeps on giving, a culinary trend that unlike, say, cupcakes never seems to get old. Bacon sales in the U.S. have increased in each of the last four years, according to market researcher Information Resources, Inc. (IRI). In 2013 alone, sales climbed 9.5% to an all-time high of nearly $4 billion. A survey by pork supplier Smithfield even found that 65% of Americans would support the idea of making bacon our “national food.”

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How a Chinese Company Built 10 Homes in 24 Hours - China Real Time Report - WSJ

China Real Time Report is a vital resource for an expanding global community trying to keep up with a country changing minute by minute. The site offers quick insight and sharp analysis from the wide network of Dow Jones reporters across Greater China, including Dow Jones Newswires’ specialists and The Wall Street Journal’s award-winning team. It also draws on the insights of commentators close to the hot topic of the day in law, policy, economics and culture. Its editors can be reached at  chinarealtime@wsj.com .

16
Koch Brothers Net Worth Tops $100 Billion as TV Warfare Escalates

Charles and David Koch , the billionaire brothers who run Wichita, Kansas-based Koch Industries Inc., added $1.3 billion to their collective fortune yesterday on reports that U.S. industrial production gained more than forecast. The surge elevated their net worth to more than $100 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

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Political Evolution: Why Do Young Voters Lean Left? It's in the Genes

In this era of big data, political pros of course have other tools at their disposal that make analysis of these large groups less relevant. As Chief Executive Officer Jim Walsh of the political ad network DSPolitical points out, it’s now easy to microtarget individuals of any age and according to dozens of other demographic and consumer categories. Nevertheless, public opinion experts still keep tabs on age groups to study their impressionability to the changing flow of history, culture, and economic cycles. In some cases, current events trump life cycle stages, altering the collective attitudes of a cohort in surprising ways. In 1984, 18- to 24-year-olds voted for Ronald Reagan over Walter Mondale by a 22-percentage-point margin—the same margin as 50- to 64-year-olds. This youth vote may have been anomalously conservative, because Reagan had presided over a strong recovery from recession and Mondale was perceived to be a weak candidate. Young Republican voters in 1984 may also have been expressing their feeling of disconnect with the liberal social movements of the 1960s and 1970s.

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Burrito Alert: Chipotle Is Raising Prices

Overall, Chipotle’s food costs stood at 34.5  of revenue the past three months, an increase of 150 basis points. Revenue was $904.2 million for the quarter, surpassing analysts’ estimates, and the company issued a bullish sales-growth forecast.

19
How Obama lost friends and influence in the Brics - FT.com

The president’s real pivot is not to Asia but to America, inspired by domestic sentiment

20
Bloomberg News

Bloomberg Television gives you an inside look at the luxury brands and trends attracting consumers everywhere from Wall Street to Silicon Valley to St. Tropez. Get the latest news about luxury real estate and travel destinations like New York, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, London, Paris, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Berlin, Moscow, Singapore and more. Bloomberg TV gives you an inside look at how to travel there in style, with the newest innovations in aviation and private jets. Find out the future of luxury cars from automakers like Porsche, Tesla, Aston Martin, Ferrari, Jaguar, Audi, BMW, Lexus, Mercedes-Benz, Maserati, Bugatti, Lotus, and Lamborghini. Check out how new trends are changing iconic fashion brands like Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Dior, Gucci, Versace, Burberry, Saint Laurent, Hermes, Michael Kors, Missoni, Giorgio Armani, Prada, Hugo Boss, Brioni, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fendi, Ralph Lauren, Dolce & Gabbana, and Lanvin. And if you like diamonds, gold, silver and other high-end commodities Bloomberg Television has the latest on luxury jewelry and watch brands like Rolex, Cartier, Patek Phillipe, Vacheron Constantin, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Bulgari, Tiffany & Co.

21
Nice work if you can get out

FOR most of human history rich people had the most leisure. In “Downton Abbey”, a drama about the British upper classes of the early 20th century, one aloof aristocrat has never heard of the term “weekend”: for her, every day is filled with leisure. On the flip side, the poor have typically slogged. Hans-Joachim Voth, an economic historian at the University of Zurich, shows that in 1800 the average English worker laboured for 64 hours a week. “In the 19th century you could tell how poor somebody was by how long they worked,” says Mr Voth.

22
The 2015 Toyota Camry Wants to Be Just as Popular, Not as Boring

Car engineers in general are paying more attention to design, and Camry competitors such as the Ford (F) Fusion and the Nissan (7201:JP) Altima have earned praise for being less boring (which is a lot to ask of a sedan). The Camry, last overhauled for the 2011 model year, just got another face-lift . The 2015 model it unveiled at the New York Auto Show this week was an ambitious (and no doubt expensive) upgrade. We cornered John Krafcik , a former chief executive of Hyundai (530:KS) North America, and asked him to walk us around the new Camry and point out the most notable changes. Here’s what caught his eye:

23
Hoops to Hooters as AK-47 Courts Moscow Mad at McDonald’s

Andrey Gomilin, director of the first Hooters venue in Moscow, which will be located near the former headquarters of the KGB, said it will be able to seat 169 people. The restaurant has 40 flat-screen televisions that will show U.S. and Russian sporting events, and an in-house store will sell Hooters merchandise such as T-shirts, hats and calendars, Gomilin said.

24
The Francis effect

BUSINESS schools regularly teach their students about great “turnaround CEOs” who breathe new life into dying organisations: figures such as IBM’s Lou Gerstner, Fiat’s Sergio Marchionne and Apple’s Steve Jobs. Now Harvard Business School needs to add another case study: Jorge Bergoglio, the man who has rebranded RC Global in barely a year.

25
Golf Courses See Green Again

Course owners and real estate investors are betting on a comeback following a downturn that was “by far the toughest ever in the industry,” says Charles Staples, co-founder of Fore Golf Partners, which has 12 courses in Florida, Virginia, and Maryland. Club memberships and rounds played are on the rise again. Prices for U.S. golf courses climbed 57 percent in 2013, according to Steven Ekovich, vice president for investments at Marcus & Millichap’s National Golf & Resort Properties Group (MMI) . Among operational, regulation-length golf courses with at least 18 holes valued at $250,000 to $75 million, the average sale price was $4.25 million last year. While that’s still below the 2006 average of $7.33 million, it’s up from the market low of $2.7 million reached in 2012.

26
PepsiCo's Snack Business Is Coming In Handy

PepsiCo (PEP) and  Coca-Cola (KO) may often be compared for their beverages, though PepsiCo now earns 52 percent of its revenue from food, via brands such as Frito-Lay and Quaker. Its snack sales are growing faster than those of its beverages, which have lagged as consumers look for healthy alternatives to soda. In the first quarter, PepsiCo’s volume sales of beverages were about even, while snack sales increased 2 percent, the company reported ( PDF ) Thursday morning.

27
5 most hygienic cruise lines

But despite Princess Cruise’s sanitation efforts — and the fact that the spread of the illness probably didn’t have anything to do with the cleanliness of that ship or crew — many Americans are worried about how clean cruise ships really are. The good news: Many are quite clean, according to government reports. Indeed, since 2010, cruise ships have only failed the Center for Disease Control’s cruise ship sanitation inspection 30 times (a score of 85 out of 100 or lower is considered failing), while the ships passed more than 900 inspections. And, according to maritime lawyer Andrew Waks, who has sued multiple cruise lines, the CDC inspections seem to be effective and cruise ships, for the most part, are clean. “I make claims against cruise lines every day of the week — mostly for personal injuries — but I don’t take most of these norovirus cases,” because typically the cruise line is not at fault, he says.

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Lunch with the FT: Jagdish Bhagwati - FT.com

It’s a blisteringly cold day in New York and I arrive at the corner of Lexington and 64th Street in need of thawing out. JoJo is a snug little restaurant inside a two-storey salmon pink house. Inside, there’s a tiny bar at the foot of the stairs leading up to the main dining area. The barman is pouring an enticing-looking glass of red wine. “I’m meeting Jagdish Bhagwati,” I say, shivering. “Could you possibly send a glass of whatever that is to our table? “This one is for Mr Bhagwati,” the barman beams. “Two glasses coming right up.”

29
Once a Notorious Short Seller, Martin Shkreli Now Sees a Future in Biotech

To realize his aspirations with Retrophin, Shkreli had to grow up in more ways than one. As a hedge fund manager, he admits, “I did sleep on the floor of my office sometimes. I didn’t brush my teeth as often as I should have.” Today, he continues, “I think my hygiene has improved quite a bit.” On the other hand, he still prides himself on obsessiveness, pointing to the stacks of well-thumbed medical journals that make sitting on his office couch impossible. “I had an investor,” he recounts, “who said to me he’d keep his money with me as long as I didn’t have a girlfriend and I didn’t start combing my hair.” Geller, the former oil trader who invested in MSMB and Retrophin, says that during one visit to the company’s new headquarters on Third Avenue, he encountered Shkreli “wandering around in fluffy slippers with a stethoscope around his neck.” Noting that the newly minted CEO lacks an M.D., Geller asked Shkreli about the get-up. “I’m working, and I’m comfortable this way,” he responded. “Geniuses do stuff like that,” Geller says, unperturbed.

30
Brazil Is the World’s Most Dangerous Country to Be an Environmentalist

The risks seem to be increasing. “Three times as many people were killed in 2012 than 10 years before,” the report notes. Those 147 deaths in 2012—the deadliest year for environmental activists to date—were “mostly assassinations of specific individuals or extrajudicial killings in the context of demonstration and protest actions.” The most significant sources of conflict were “opposition to land-grabbing and unfair land ownership, large-scale mining operations, deforestation, illegal logging, and hydroelectric projects.” Violence also arose during protests over water pollution, toxic waste disposal, and drainage of wetlands.

31
Two Hours Turned School Island Excursion to Horror at Sea

“Two days before she was heading off on this trip, she told us that she didn’t want to go because she didn’t want to travel on a ferry,” Ji Yoon’s grandmother said, speaking at the center in a shaking voice, tears running down her face, her brown handbag lying on the ground where she dropped it. She had raised the girl because Ji Yoon’s parents worked. “We told her that she would regret it if she didn’t go. Now we regret it. We shouldn’t have made her go.”

32
Inside Tumblr's HQ: What Keeps Them in New York: Video

April 16 (Bloomberg) -- What does an office say about a company? Bloomberg's Stephanie Ruhle goes inside the offices of the hottest tech companies in Manhattan to see what their space tells us about the direction of these companies -- starting with Tumblr. Tumblr has grown up since it moved into its current Manhattan office in 2010. CEO David Karp strives to keep a family vibe at Tumblr headquarters. But how is he making that happen as he transitions from start-up to a mature company all under the watchful and demanding eye of its parent company Yahoo?

33
Short Sellers Miss the Tech Slump

Bears may have been discouraged by the market’s quick recoveries from recent dips. The Nasdaq 100 declined 5.2 percent from Jan. 22 to Feb. 3, and last year slipped 3.4 percent from Oct. 2 to Oct. 9 and 6 percent from May 17 through June 24. Each time, the index climbed above its previous high within a month of reaching the low. “You have to defer to the strength that’s pushing the stocks higher,” says David Pavan, a portfolio manager at ClariVest Asset Management. Short sellers “just pulled back, and there was no appetite to keep stepping in front of it.”

34
Toyota Plans Scion Overhaul as Youth Brand Hits Adolescence

Toyota Motor Corp. (7203) ’s Scion line, a U.S. experiment intended to win over young buyers with idiosyncratic designs and low prices, will overhaul its lineup amid fading sales as the brand reaches adolescence.

35
Premarkets: Chipper after the long weekend

Netflix (NFLX) will be reporting after the market closes. The stock has been one of Wall Street's big momentum plays and the top performer in the S&P 500 last year, with an incredible 269% rise. But tech stocks have been volatile over the past several weeks, and Netflix shares are down 6% this year.

36
Review: FX's Fargo TV Miniseries

A similar question arises when watching Fargo , an FX (FOX) miniseries that premiered on April 15. It’s based, of course, on the 1996 film by Joel and Ethan Coen, perhaps their best-loved work. The movie tells the story of a henpecked loser of a car salesman, Jerry Lundegaard, who hires two violent criminals to kidnap his wife (then tries to keep the ransom from his father-in-law), and of Marge Gunderson, the extremely pregnant police chief who solves the crime after it goes bloodily awry. The TV show is likewise about a loser salesman, some out-of-town crooks, and a dogged female cop. But you won’t see any of the actual characters or events from the film. Until the appearance of a mysterious briefcase, there’s nothing to suggest both stories even exist in the same universe.

37
The new wealth gap: Study shows life-expectancy growing faster for higher earners.

The report doesn’t explore the possible causes of the growing life-expectancy gap. But the authors do highlight one important implication—that the change skews Social Security benefits away from lower earners and toward the more affluent. People born in 1920 could collect full Social Security benefits starting at age 65; for workers born after 1937, that full-benefit eligibility age has gradually risen, and people born in or after 1960 won’t qualify for full benefits until age 67. ( See a more detailed eligibility chart here .) The Brookings data suggests that for most women, and for men in the bottom 10% of earners, the Social Security eligibility age is rising faster than life expectancies—which means that, on average, members of those groups will have fewer years to collect benefits.

38
Patagonia Dreaming: Kris Tompkins Works to Build the Best National Park

Later this year the two plan to open Patagonia Park in Chile, the crown jewel of their park-making efforts. The intention is to invite the public with a grand opening in December and pursue formal national park status in the years ahead. And this one really is Kris’s baby. In 2004 she used $1.7 million of her own equity from Patagonia in the purchase of the Estancia Valle Chacabuco, a ranch of historical significance in the Aysén district. Combined with adjacent parcels, it spans nearly 200,000 acres. Despite the recession, she and Conservacion Patagonica, the nonprofit foundation that endows and manages the park, have raised and invested about $45.5 million in the park’s infrastructure, soft-launching a well-appointed eco-lodge in 2011. On top of three new trails, the park-in-progress offers white-water rafting, fly fishing, and a chance to closely observe pink flamingos and guanacos, which look like llamas with camel necks and are innately comical. Several travel magazines have already gushed about it. Bruce Babbitt, the U.S. secretary of Interior under Bill Clinton, has given it the equivalent of a dust jacket rave, predicting that it “will be the Yellowstone of South America.

39
Smuggling Sparks Questions about Philippine Current Account - Real Time Economics - WSJ

One reason could be a smuggling problem that has resulted in significant irregularities in the country’s trade data. Some analysts say a proper accounting might show that the country’s current account is actually in deficit – at a time when skittish investors have been punishing developing economies that are too dependent on foreign funding.

40
What I Wear to Work: Artist Elisabeth Condon

What do you wear? I’m a pajama painter. I wear soft cotton tops and sweatshirts. Today I’m wearing my favorite dress for gallery openings. It fits really well and is bright and splashy like my paintings. It’s buoyant.

41
Detroit Close to Agreements With More Creditors on Plan

Detroit is close to agreements with more creditors on a plan to reduce its $18 billion debt load, lawyers for the city told a judge who withheld a final ruling on whether to allow a vote on the proposal.

42
Mortgage Lending Hits a 17-Year Low

Mortgage lending is at a 17-year low. It began declining in mid-2013, when interest rates jumped about a percentage point.

43
Fit for a king: Tutankhamun’s replica burial chamber - FT.com

In November 1922, Howard Carter, a British archaeologist who had spent all his adult life in Egypt, made the discovery that resonated throughout an incredulous world, and continues, even in the age of cinematic blockbuster and virtual-reality-on-demand, to enthral us. Carter was a man who combined practical ingenuity and a vivid sense of romance: he had spent five years, supported by his patron, Lord Carnarvon, excavating in the Valley of the Kings in Thebes (modern-day Luxor), conducting a passionate and well-planned search for the royal tombs of ancient Egypt. But the results were discouraging. This was to be his final dig. One day, after exposing the bases of some of the workmen’s huts, he found a step that had been carved into the rock. He intensified his efforts and days later was joined by his sponsor. Lord Carnarvon was standing by him when Carter made a small breach in the corner of a sealed door. He inserted a candle to shed light on his investigation.

44
Business Economists See Brighter Outlook for Job Growth - Real Time Economics - WSJ

The poll by the National Association for Business Economics said 43% of corporate economists expect hiring within their firm or industry to increase during the next six months. That was the most optimistic forecast since July 2011. The latest poll found that only 8% of economists expect businesses to cut payrolls over the next two quarters.

45
From Noah to Moses, why the renewed interest in Bible films? - FT.com

As far back as I can remember, Easter weekend in my Toronto household has involved Mass, new white shoes for first my little sisters and now my little daughters, and a burnished, eyebrow-rippling Charlton Heston on our TV, solemnly hamming it up as Moses for hours on end. My wife, who grew up hundreds of miles away in Milwaukee, likewise remembers Mass, ham, and Bible movies as Eastertime staples. For the Bible has been a source for movies since the earliest days of cinema – adaptations of Christ’s passion, and of the stories of Salome and of the sacrifice of Jephthah’s daughter were made in the early 1900s, while the earliest movies about the Ten Commandments and the Great Flood came out in the 1920s.

46
12 Ways to Save Money on Food - US News

Cutting costs at the grocery store and restaurants can save you hundreds of dollars each year.

47
How to Save $500 This Month - US News

If money is tight and you need to drastically reduce your budget , here are some strategies to start saving right away. Putting even one of these ideas into practice should give your finances some much-needed breathing room, but if you adopt all of them, as long as your income remains steady, you could be looking at an extra $500 – or more – this month. 

48
The Psychology of Being Fired - US News

Carter advises you consult with an emotional health professional if your disposition is extreme. Sadness and anger are fleeting and manageable emotions, but rage and severe depression aren’t. “It’s normal to feel sad, in some cases very sad, after losing a job,” she says. “However, if the depression gets to the point where thoughts of suicide develop or the person is so depressed that they can’t get out of bed or can’t function effectively, then that is not normal.”

49
The Collison brothers and $1.75bn online payments start-up Stripe - FT.com

For two young founders of a billion-dollar start-up, the Collison brothers are remarkably self-effacing. Patrick and John grew up in a small hamlet outside the Irish city of Limerick in the 1990s and now live in a modest two-bedroom apartment in San Francisco’s fashionable Mission neighbourhood.

50
Tesla to Start Model S Sales to China’s Elusive Motorists

While entering the country presents an opportunity for Tesla to sell as many vehicles there as in the U.S. by as soon as next year, Musk, 42, will attempt to accomplish what the government has struggled to do: get people to buy electric cars. The carmaker’s entries into the world’s most populous country and Europe this year are part of a strategy to boost production of its Model S by 56 percent.

51 Mustang 50th edition premieres in New York
52 Japan’s Abe Sends Traditional Offering to Yasukuni Shrine
53 What Are the Barriers to Breastfeeding? - Real Time Economics - WSJ
54 Detroit’s $1,000 houses may be a lousy deal
55 Deutsche Bank Tops Korean Merger Advisory on Anheuser-Busch Deal
56 Facebook Adds Mobile Feature for Finding Nearby Friends
57 Apple, Google vie to offer exclusive game apps The Wall Street Journal
58 Exelon Beating Facebook in S&P 500 After Valuation Scare
59 Bringing the Wal-Mart Edge to Financial Products
60 Before and After Easter, Americans Lose Their Taste for Lamb
61 Easter Bunny, Move Over, Russia’s Now Got Easter Turkey
62 South Korea Ferry Probe Focuses on Vessel’s Sharp Turn
63 Japanese ship seized in wartime claims row - FT.com
64 Cleaning out Mom & Dad’s home without a fight
65 Bathtubs are out, big showers are in Amy Hoak's Home Economics
66 Dodge Charger gets revamp
67 Deepwater Horizon: Cleaning up - FT.com
68 Crowdsourcing Site Tongal Awards Its Winning Ad Pitches
69 Cruise Fights Drones in New 'Top Gun': Bruckheimer: Video
70 China carmakers feel slowdown - FT Business - Companies & Management Video - FT.com
71 BOJ Hopes for Slowdown in Overseas Production Exodus - Real Time Economics - WSJ
72 We're Working Less; Is That Really So Bad?
73 Malaysia Airlines flight makes emergency landing
74 Slowing economy isn’t China’s biggest problem Outside the Box
75 Pfizer held now-discontinued talks with AstraZeneca: report
76 Myanmar media emerges from decades of censorship - FT World - World & Global Economy Video - FT.com
77 Gold adds to slide as economy improves Metals Stocks
78 How Innovation May Make Wall Street Less Efficient - Real Time Economics - WSJ
79 What's Inside the Redesigned Rolls-Royce Ghost: Video
80 Revving up
81 What to look for in Netflix’s earnings Monday Earnings Outlook
82 Stowaway teen survives 5.5-hour flight hidden in frigid wheel well
83 VW Signals It Will Outsell GM in China Again This Year
84 Do Prizes Dent Productivity? - Real Time Economics - WSJ
85 Former UK soldiers bring discipline to work - FT.com
86 Workers’ Earnings Climb at Healthy Pace in First Quarter - Real Time Economics - WSJ
87 How to negotiate with your credit card company
88 Ducasse Likes London So Much, He Plans to Open More Restaurants
89 StockTwits Signals Top Trending People
90 The fire every time
91 Japan’s Trade Deficit Widens More Than Forecast as Exports Slow
92 Risk of Stock Pullback Continues - MoneyBeat - WSJ
93 Obama: Ukraine Can Be Sovereign and Independent: Video
94 HTC’s Wang Parachutes Back to Reverse Falling Phone Sales
95 Hybrid laundromat-cafes are popping up across the country
96 Despite Hazardous Smog, Beijing Breaks Into Ranks of Top 10 Global Cities, Says A.T. Kearney
97 Clipped wings
98 Spring Cold Adds to Woes for Eastern U.S. Fruit Crops
99 They are risen
100 Asia Stocks blog: Japan stocks rise on weaker yen, but a record trade deficit triggers doubts