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2
Presidential Debate: Rules and format

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Investors get set to keep an eye on the first U.S. presidential debate

On the other hand, Trump’s policies tend to flap about in the political breeze, and it’s possible, though unlikely, he will soften his anti-trade stance in the debate to appease big business. It’s also possible, and more likely, that should he become POTUS, Trump will never really get around to taking on America’s alleged trade enemies. (Eight years ago, a very different presidential candidate vowed to renegotiate NAFTA and never did. His name is Barack Obama.)

4
Money’s the conversation

To the extent that the candidates do talk about America’s longer-term fiscal woes, Mrs Clinton is the more credible. For instance, she promises to expand the Affordable Care Act’s fledgling cost-saving experiments in Medicare. Yet because the trust fund for Medicare runs dry only in 2028, and the Social Security fund only in 2034, this issue will only really grab politicians—and electorates—later. Mr Trump is not interested; Mrs Clinton, for once, not scrutinised. America would be best-served by a rigorous contest of economic ideas. It is not getting that.

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http://on.ft.com/2d2QEQI

6
Deutsche Bank Slumps as Investors Question Lender’s Health

Deutsche Bank AG shares dropped to a record low and its riskiest bonds declined after a media report said the German government wouldn’t step in to back the lender, fueling investor concerns about its weakened finances.

7
Clinton, Trump, and Your Money: A Personal-Finance Guide to the Debate

Clinton's approach would cost wealthy families the most, while they would appear to benefit under Trump. Whatever happens in the end, the debate over taxes is a good reminder to pay attention to the tax treatment of your investments. Vigilance can boost your income in what could be a low-return environment if the economy continues on its current path.

8
Bankrupt Mining Town Downsizes to Avoid Becoming a Ghost

To keep from becoming a so-called ghost town—when a city ceases to function due to a precipitous decline in population and is ultimately abandoned—Yubari embarked on a drastic experiment. City officials began merging schools, slashing government jobs and salaries, halting funds for public swimming pools, toilets and parks, curtailing services such as bus routes and snow removal, and downgrading the local hospital to a clinic. The most drastic measure has been the forced relocation of hundreds of residents from public housing on the city’s outskirts to blocks of new, low-rise apartments closer to the city center.

9
Deutsche Bank Slumps as Investors Question Lender’s Health

Deutsche Bank AG shares dropped to a record low and its riskiest bonds declined after a media report said the German government wouldn’t step in to back the lender, fueling investor concerns about its weakened finances.

10
Here’s What Clinton and Trump Must Do on the Debate Stage to Win the Night

Assuming Clinton doesn't pass out - all Trump has to do is bring up the sharp increase in crime, all the recent terrorist attacks, and attach these to Obama and Clinton's policies of open borders, not enforcing immigration laws, and propping up criminals while waging a war on the police force.  And oh - all the wonderful progress made by Democrats in the black communities in NYC, Detroit, LA, Chicago, Baltimore, .....

11
Philippine Officials Seek to Soothe Investors Spooked by Duterte

Philippine central bank Governor Amando Tetangco sought to soothe investors spooked by President Rodrigo Duterte’s rhetoric around his anti-drug war, with stocks poised for the longest outflow since 2007.

12
Treasuries Face Pressure as Biggest Buyers Reverse Course: Chart

Foreign central banks, which poured into U.S. government debt after the global financial crisis, are changing tack . Holders like China and other central banks culled their stakes. The drop coincides with the recent backup in U.S. bond yields, which have been rising since July.

13
Trump Looks to Apply New Campaign Discipline at First Debate

By and large, since Bannon, Conway, and Bossie have taken the reins of the campaign, Trump has stuck to prepared remarks on a teleprompter screen and steered clear of generating negative headlines with his own off-the-cuff remarks. But on Saturday, Trump caused a stir when he tweeted a taunt at Clinton, 68, suggesting “perhaps I will put Gennifer Flowers” in the front row at the debate, referring to a woman Clinton’s husband had an affair with decades ago.

14
What is the Alt-Right?

The name sounds like a keyboard shortcut, which is appropriate because the Alt-Right is largely an online phenomenon. Its more cerebral fellow-travellers reheat criticisms of democracy that have been around since Plato. They argue that government of and by the people is flawed, and would prefer something more like the enlightened absolutism of Prussia under Frederick the Great. These people are not the ones to worry about. The bits of the Alt-Right that matter right now are those who say that members of different races should be kept apart, who aim abuse at Jewish Americans and think that calling a podcast “The Daily Shoah” is striking a bold blow for freedom of speech and against political correctness. To the extent that the Alt-Right dabbles in economics it is highly protectionist. It sees misogyny as a bold rebellion against the prevailing culture. Its favourite symbol is a cartoon frog called Pepe (pictured above).

15
Hedge Funds Misread Fed With Bullish Dollar Bets at 7-Month High

Behold the GOP’s Not-So-Secret Plan to Dismantle Government Services: Defund, Degrade and then Privatize While Trump dominates the headlines, House Republicans slash Social Security and drive the system toward disaster. By Paul Rosenberg One side effect of the three-ring circus this presidential campaign has become is the distraction it provides so that other damaging agendas can be advanced with little or no attention. Take for example, the Republican Party’s long-standing efforts to dismantle America’s internationally modest, but still crucially important welfare state, which helps keep tens of millions of Americans out of poverty. Social Security and Medicare have both been top targets via various schemes over the years, and this budget cycle is no exception, regardless of what noises Donald Trump may make. The need for Social Security staff services has increased as baby boomers begin to retire. Instead, these services have been cut back since 2011. And in late July, as theAmerican Federation of Government Employees noted, “the House Appropriations Committee cut President Obama’s proposed budget for the Social Security Administration (SSA) by $1.

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http://ft.com/

17
How Janet Yellen rationalizes history's most pervasive financial bubble

Behold the GOP’s Not-So-Secret Plan to Dismantle Government Services: Defund, Degrade and then Privatize While Trump dominates the headlines, House Republicans slash Social Security and drive the system toward disaster. By Paul Rosenberg One side effect of the three-ring circus this presidential campaign has become is the distraction it provides so that other damaging agendas can be advanced with little or no attention. Take for example, the Republican Party’s long-standing efforts to dismantle America’s internationally modest, but still crucially important welfare state, which helps keep tens of millions of Americans out of poverty. Social Security and Medicare have both been top targets via various schemes over the years, and this budget cycle is no exception, regardless of what noises Donald Trump may make. The need for Social Security staff services has increased as baby boomers begin to retire. Instead, these services have been cut back since 2011. And in late July, as theAmerican Federation of Government Employees noted, “the House Appropriations Committee cut President Obama’s proposed budget for the Social Security Administration (SSA) by $1.

18
A Weaker Currency Is No Longer Economic Elixir It Once Was

Just look at Japan, where the yen plunged 28 percent in the two years through 2014, yet net exports to America still fell by 10 percent. Or at the U.K., where the pound’s 19 percent tumble in the two years through 2009 couldn’t stave off a 26 percent decline in shipments to the U.S. In fact, since the turn of the century, the ability of exchange-rate movements to affect trade and growth in major economies has fallen by more than half, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

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Log In - The New York Times

© 2016 The New York Times Company

20
Big Spending on Warplanes Spurs Aerial Arms Race

For more than two decades, combat aircraft flown by the U.S. and its European allies have pretty much owned the sky. Now, Russia and China are spending lavishly on new weapons that could challenge that superiority, spurring a new arms race.

21
Why Disney should buy Twitter

Behold the GOP’s Not-So-Secret Plan to Dismantle Government Services: Defund, Degrade and then Privatize While Trump dominates the headlines, House Republicans slash Social Security and drive the system toward disaster. By Paul Rosenberg One side effect of the three-ring circus this presidential campaign has become is the distraction it provides so that other damaging agendas can be advanced with little or no attention. Take for example, the Republican Party’s long-standing efforts to dismantle America’s internationally modest, but still crucially important welfare state, which helps keep tens of millions of Americans out of poverty. Social Security and Medicare have both been top targets via various schemes over the years, and this budget cycle is no exception, regardless of what noises Donald Trump may make. The need for Social Security staff services has increased as baby boomers begin to retire. Instead, these services have been cut back since 2011. And in late July, as theAmerican Federation of Government Employees noted, “the House Appropriations Committee cut President Obama’s proposed budget for the Social Security Administration (SSA) by $1.

22
Rolling Stone sells 49% stake in magazine to Singapore firm

BandLab Technologies Ltd., a closely held Singapore-based social music company, has purchased a 49% stake in the storied music brand, including the magazine and its digital assets.

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Mind your language: the fightback against global English - FT.com

24
Presidential Debates Will Be a Major Influence for a Third of Voters, Poll Says

A new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll found that 34% of registered voters think the three presidential debates would be extremely or quite important in helping them decide whom to support for president. About 11% of voters are considered “debate persuadables”—that is, they think the debates are important and are either third-party voters or only loosely committed to either major-party candidate.

25
German Business Confidence Rises to Highest Level Since 2014

German business sentiment surged to the highest level in more than two years in September in a sign that corporate concerns are easing over the economic outlook and the consequences of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, a report from the Munich-based Ifo institute showed on Monday.

26
How one boutique bat maker is getting in the hands of Major League Baseball’s big hitters

IS DONALD TRUMP A COCAINE ADDICT OR NOT? . Addiction to cocaine and other drugs might explain Trump's odd positions, outrageous lies, additiction to conspiracy theories and other behaviors. How much would you wager on that? . I never thought about that until reading about a new historical study suggests addiction to both cocaine and methamphemines, which would explain Hitler's some of his increasingly eratic behavior later. Whether or not you agree with my theory, you'll probably find the folloing article fascinating. Look it up by title. . TITLE: "High Hitler: how Nazi drug abuse steered the course of history." German writer Norman Ohler’s astonishing account of methamphetamine addiction in the Third Reich changes what we know about the second world war. . EXCERPT: Some drugs... had their uses, particularly in a society hell bent on keeping up with the energetic Hitler (“Germany awake!” the Naziis ordered, and the nation had no choice but to snap to attention). A substance that could “integrate shirkers, malingerers, defeatists and whiners” into the labour market might even be sanctioned.

27
Aldi Steps Up U.K. Push With $390 Million Store Revamp Plan

While cutting prices on 30 percent of its products so far this year, Aldi has also won favor with more affluent Brits, who have cast aside stereotypes of Aldi as a place where only hard-up consumers shop. The price war, sparked by Aldi and rival discounter Lidl, has seen profits tumble at larger rivals such as Tesco Plc, while Wal-Mart Stores Inc’s U.K. chain Asda posted its worst-ever sales decline this year.

28
Larry Fink Sees Markets Falling 15% Without Fiscal Action

Laurence D. Fink, who runs the world’s largest asset manager as chief executive officer of BlackRock Inc., said markets may fall 15 percent if governments don’t take aggressive fiscal policy actions and there are aberrant results from referendums in Europe.

29
Europe’s Top Banker Is Going on a Political Roadtrip

Mario Draghi will visit Brussels and Berlin this week with his increasingly urgent message that governments must act to bolster the economy. In the German capital, he may have a special request: Spend more, now.

30
Wells Fargo customers recall their shock upon discovering fraudulent accounts

Behold the GOP’s Not-So-Secret Plan to Dismantle Government Services: Defund, Degrade and then Privatize While Trump dominates the headlines, House Republicans slash Social Security and drive the system toward disaster. By Paul Rosenberg One side effect of the three-ring circus this presidential campaign has become is the distraction it provides so that other damaging agendas can be advanced with little or no attention. Take for example, the Republican Party’s long-standing efforts to dismantle America’s internationally modest, but still crucially important welfare state, which helps keep tens of millions of Americans out of poverty. Social Security and Medicare have both been top targets via various schemes over the years, and this budget cycle is no exception, regardless of what noises Donald Trump may make. The need for Social Security staff services has increased as baby boomers begin to retire. Instead, these services have been cut back since 2011. And in late July, as theAmerican Federation of Government Employees noted, “the House Appropriations Committee cut President Obama’s proposed budget for the Social Security Administration (SSA) by $1.

31
U.S. New-Home Sales Down in August, but Broader Trend Still Positive

WASHINGTON—Sales of newly built homes pulled back in August after surging the prior month, though the broader trend showed solid momentum in the market for single-family houses.

32
Uber’s Chinese Rival Didi Buys Into Bicycle-Sharing Startup Ofo

Didi is investing tens of millions of dollars in ofo , a bikes-on-demand startup conceived two years ago on the grounds of Beijing’s prestigious Peking University as a student project, and which now bills itself as the country’s largest bicycle-sharing platform. The company founded by college alumnus Dai Wei operates almost 70,000 bright-yellow bikes and handles half a million rides daily across 20 cities, Didi said in an e-mailed statement.

33
Why Employers Are Making Pay Equity a Reality

Mabel Abraham, a management professor at Columbia Business School, examined the records of a retail bank and found that gender-pay disparities among bank tellers were lower in branches managed by women. “They were paying men slightly less and paying women slightly more” than at branches managed by men, she says. The findings suggest “we can’t just assume formalization is the answer to inequality,” she says. The best course is to first create equitable processes, she says, and then formalize those.

34
Clinton-Trump debate showdown carries potential to sock it to stocks

Investors will be keeping a close eye on the first of the presidential debates between Democrat nominee Hillary Clinton and GOP nominee Donald Trump for signs of a momentum shift in the heated race.

35
Apple Is Now Boring Enough to Buy for $37 Billion Stock Sifter

Behold the GOP’s Not-So-Secret Plan to Dismantle Government Services: Defund, Degrade and then Privatize While Trump dominates the headlines, House Republicans slash Social Security and drive the system toward disaster. By Paul Rosenberg One side effect of the three-ring circus this presidential campaign has become is the distraction it provides so that other damaging agendas can be advanced with little or no attention. Take for example, the Republican Party’s long-standing efforts to dismantle America’s internationally modest, but still crucially important welfare state, which helps keep tens of millions of Americans out of poverty. Social Security and Medicare have both been top targets via various schemes over the years, and this budget cycle is no exception, regardless of what noises Donald Trump may make. The need for Social Security staff services has increased as baby boomers begin to retire. Instead, these services have been cut back since 2011. And in late July, as theAmerican Federation of Government Employees noted, “the House Appropriations Committee cut President Obama’s proposed budget for the Social Security Administration (SSA) by $1.

36
Brexit Bulletin: CEOs Make Plans for Life After Britain

To no-one’s surprise Jeremy Corbyn was re-elected Labour leader, and said manufacturing will suffer if Britain loses trade ties with the EU. He also called on Theresa May to better inform parliament of her plans for the Brexit negotiations.

37
Brutal Upheavals Mount as S&P 500 Bull Market Nears 8th Year

It wasn’t hard to sense the unease that gripped traders this summer as U.S. stocks meandered through their calmest period ever. As it turns out, they were right to be on edge.

38
Global stocks fall before U.S. presidential debate, oil rises

Behold the GOP’s Not-So-Secret Plan to Dismantle Government Services: Defund, Degrade and then Privatize While Trump dominates the headlines, House Republicans slash Social Security and drive the system toward disaster. By Paul Rosenberg One side effect of the three-ring circus this presidential campaign has become is the distraction it provides so that other damaging agendas can be advanced with little or no attention. Take for example, the Republican Party’s long-standing efforts to dismantle America’s internationally modest, but still crucially important welfare state, which helps keep tens of millions of Americans out of poverty. Social Security and Medicare have both been top targets via various schemes over the years, and this budget cycle is no exception, regardless of what noises Donald Trump may make. The need for Social Security staff services has increased as baby boomers begin to retire. Instead, these services have been cut back since 2011. And in late July, as theAmerican Federation of Government Employees noted, “the House Appropriations Committee cut President Obama’s proposed budget for the Social Security Administration (SSA) by $1.

39
Rediscovery

These artists did not forget their African-American predecessors; indeed, they often championed them in discussions about their work. This endorsement has influenced the art market, especially as collectors often start with contemporary art and work back. Mr Bradford is represented by one the market’s leading galleries, Hauser & Wirth, which earlier this year took on one of his inspirations, a 76-year-old abstract painter, Jack Whitten. “The market is hungry for material, and if the material is good—and relatively undervalued—it will eat it up,” says Franklin Sirmans, director of the Pérez Art Museum in Miami. Swann Galleries, which has dedicated African-American sales, confirms that the market for many of the older generation of artists is growing rapidly.

40
Pressure Mounts on Pound as Hard-Brexit View Back in Spotlight

The pound depreciated 0.3 percent to 86.85 pence per euro as of 3:50 p.m. London time. It touched 87.25 pence on Aug. 16, the weakest level since August 2013. Sterling was little changed at $1.2965, having dropped 0.4 percent earlier. It touched a 31-year low of $1.2798 on July 6 and is down 13 percent versus the dollar since the June 23 referendum.

41
PBOC Drains Most Funds in Six Months Amid Debt Curb Speculation

China’s central bank drained the most funds from the financial system in six months, adding to speculation that it is keeping a tight rein on cash supply as part of efforts to curb excessive leverage.

42
Bloomberg on Twitter

Oil investors are losing confidence that OPEC will reach an output deal this week http://bloom.bg/2dvcSgI  pic.twitter.com/ceYo9sR4Os

43
CBOE, Bats Deal Creates New Exchange Behemoth

CBOE Holdings Inc. will buy Bats Global Markets Inc. for about $3.2 billion, in a deal that would create a new global exchange behemoth in the trading of stocks, options and exchange-traded funds.

44 Why Mondays are really the absolute worst

Behold the GOP’s Not-So-Secret Plan to Dismantle Government Services: Defund, Degrade and then Privatize While Trump dominates the headlines, House Republicans slash Social Security and drive the system toward disaster. By Paul Rosenberg One side effect of the three-ring circus this presidential campaign has become is the distraction it provides so that other damaging agendas can be advanced with little or no attention. Take for example, the Republican Party’s long-standing efforts to dismantle America’s internationally modest, but still crucially important welfare state, which helps keep tens of millions of Americans out of poverty. Social Security and Medicare have both been top targets via various schemes over the years, and this budget cycle is no exception, regardless of what noises Donald Trump may make. The need for Social Security staff services has increased as baby boomers begin to retire. Instead, these services have been cut back since 2011. And in late July, as theAmerican Federation of Government Employees noted, “the House Appropriations Committee cut President Obama’s proposed budget for the Social Security Administration (SSA) by $1.

45
Financial Times on Twitter

Find out what the Nokia CEO reads on his way to work http://on.ft.com/2dm0wV5  pic.twitter.com/Iam6QcMcZ5

46
Yeti: How a $67 Million Investment Became a $3.3 Billion Windfall

If all goes as hoped, Cortec Group, with just 20 employees in Midtown Manhattan, could make a profit on paper of about $3.3 billion in the coming initial public offering of Yeti Holdings Inc., according to people familiar with the matter.

47
Citigroup Accelerates Saudi Return Plans With Megabond Mandate

The bank’s efforts may be paying off after it won a role as lead adviser on Saudi Arabia’s first international bond sale, which could raise at least $10 billion as soon as next month. Citigroup is keen to profit from a potential fee bonanza as the nation undergoes an unprecedented economic shakeup, including plans to create the world’s largest sovereign wealth fund and sell shares of crude giant Saudi Arabia Oil Co. in an initial public offering.

48
Saudi Arabia Injects $5.3 Billion Into Banks to Ease Crunch

Saudi Arabia’s central bank stepped up efforts to support lenders in the Arab world’s biggest economy as they grapple with the effects of low oil prices. Banks’ shares advanced.

49
ChemChina Seeks EU Approval for $43 Billion Syngenta Takeover

China National Chemical Corp. sought European Union approval for its $43 billion takeover of Syngenta AG, one of a trio of mega-deals reshaping the global agrichemicals industry already described as “quite concentrated” by the bloc’s antitrust chief.

50
Naming and Shaming Palm-Oil Buyers to Stop Rainforest Burning

Groups like Greenpeace and the Union of Concerned Scientists have taken to naming and shaming companies that they say aren't doing enough to make suppliers stop the destruction of rainforests and peatlands. On Sept. 21, WWF released its 2016 Palm Oil Buyers Scorecard, looking at the policies of 137 companies worldwide. The good news, according to WWF, "at least half of the companies we looked at" have made "gratifying progress" toward using sustainable palm oil that meets criteria such as a ban on the destruction of primary forests.

51 Bloomberg on Twitter
52 Iran issues local credit cards for the first time in decades
53 U.S. Voters to Watch Debates Mulling ‘Risky’ and ‘Scary’ Choices
54 Oil Climbs to $45 as Saudi Offer Opens Door to Future OPEC Deal
55 Financial Times on Twitter
56 These Are The 50 Most Influential People In The World Of Finance
57 Japan Scrambles Jets After China Makes Show of Force in Key Strait
58 The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
59 China Warns on City Bank Risks as Regulator Cites Global Crisis
60 Has the U.S. Presidency Become a Dictatorship? - Freakonomics
61 Iron Giants to Add 200 Million Tons of Supplies Through 2020
62 NYT Business on Twitter
63 Global Economy Week Ahead: Yellen, Draghi and Kuroda Speak; EU and Japan Inflation
64 Japanese Companies and Households Continue to Pile Up Cash
65 Russia accused of ‘barbarism’ in Syria, fears over 'hard Brexit' - FirstFT - World & Global Economy Video - FT.com
66 http://on.ft.com/2dvIgMm
67 Stocks Down as Bank Shares Fall
68 Taking the rap
69 Jobs Recovery Reaches Plateau, Posing a Challenge for Forecasters
70 Debate commission chief: Candidates should fact-check each other
71 A ham-fisted hegemon
72 Stocks Fall as Deutsche Bank Leads Rout in Lenders; Bonds Climb
73 Bottling hipness
74 Britons Can’t Stop Checking Their Phones at Night
75 Jane Pauley Replacing Osgood At 'Sunday Morning'
76 DNA Testing Could Put an End to Fake Egyptian Cotton
77 ‘Magnificent Seven’ Remake From Sony Tops Weekend Box Office
78 Furniture retailer West Elm to open chain of boutique hotels
79 Japan's Abe Could Be Longest-Serving Premier Since WWII Despite Failures
80 I'm voting for the 'lesser of two evils' this election
81 The space between
82 What Unites and Divides Americans
83 http://on.ft.com/2dvaneC
84 Join the queue
85 Americans spend over $3,600 a year just to work — How you can save
86 Reputation Under Fire, the IRS Pulls a Gun—Al Capone’s
87 The Economist on Twitter
88 Charlotte Police Release Video of Shooting But Doubts Remain
89 The economy stinks, but I'm doing OK, say working class whites
90 Will BlackBerry Ltd keep making hardware? Time's up for CEO John Chen’s profitability deadline
91 Bloomberg on Twitter
92 Get ready. One of tech’s biggest darlings is in for a bumpy ride
93 Should I rent or buy a house?
94 Get ready. One of tech’s biggest darlings is in for a bumpy ride
95 Fast FT
96 Financial Times on Twitter
97 Bank of America Said to Be Cutting Jobs in Asia Pacific
98 The Economist on Twitter
99 Donald Trump Would Boost Debt More Than Hillary Clinton, Report Says
100 http://ft.trib.al/eV2grSq